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Discovering Our Vinis Ancestors

Vinish and Vinnish Family History

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Ferencz Vinis

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Ferencz Vinis, known as Francis or Frank Vinish in Canada was born Nov 4, 1865 in a German community in the village of Herczegfalva, Fejér, Hungary. Since 1951 the village has been known as Mezőfalva.

Ferencz’s occupation was a földműves which translates to a peasant farmer who didn’t own his own land. The land surrounding Herczegfalva was owned by the Roman Catholic church. The church hired farmers on a daily or short term and seasonal basis. If a family could not afford to buy their own home, they rented their house from the church.

In 1888 Ferencz married Erzsébet Braun, known as Örzse. Six children were born to the couple. Ferencz, Pál, Katalin, János, Anna and József. Katalin died at seven months old and József died at the age of four months.

In 1900, due to the church purchasing 40 combines and putting their employees out of work, the church encouraged the unemployed farmers to immigrate to North America. Hundreds of people left Herczegfalva, Adony and surrounding villages, some settled in New Jersey and along the eastern coast of the United States while others continued onto Saskatchewan in Canada to take advantage of the Canadian government’s land grants of 160 acres of land.

Wanting a better life for their children and the opportunity to own their own farmland, at the age of 37, Ferencz and Örzse decided to immigrate to Canada. Ferencz left Örzse who was expecting their sixth child, and his four children behind until he established a home for them in Canada. Ferencz travelled from Budapest to Hamburg Germany by train, then departed from Hamburg on January 12th 1902, sailing on the S.S. Pretoria with the destination of Rosthern, North West Territories in Canada. Fifteen other people from Herczegfalva sailed on the same ship, with their destination also, Rosthern. Can you imagine crossing the Atlantic Ocean in January? Ferencz arrived on Ellis Island in New Jersey, USA on Jan. 25th 1902. He then travelled by train to Saskatchewan where he applied for his homestead on Feb. 17th.

On March 11, 1902, Örzse gave birth to baby József in Herczegfalva. Sadly, József died on July 26th, followed by the death of Örzse two days later. In June 1903, Frank Jr., Paul, John and Annie immigrated to Canada to join their father and new wife, Terézia Göller, who was also from Herczegfalva. Anglicizing their names, the four children born to Frank and Theresa, were Joseph, Stephen, Theresa, and Mary.

Frank died Nov 03, 1946 in Wakaw Saskatchewan. Theresa died in 1949. Both are buried in St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Cemetery in Wakaw.

To discover more about your ancestors, click on Ferencz’s portrait beside this text or his name from the top menu bar or scroll down the this homepage a bit and click on one of the eight photos below of your direct ancestor.
Come back soon to see our future history pages: HISTORIES


Our Ancestors

Frank F. Vinish
Frank F. Vinish

Frank F. Vinish

Search the database for Ferenc Vinis born 1888

Baptised as Ferenc Vinis and known as Frank F. Vinish in Canada. Frank was born Dec 03, 1888 in Herczegfalva, Fejér, Hungary. He immigrated from Hungary in 1903 at the age of 15 with siblings Paul, John and Annie.

Frank married Anna Habetler in 1914 and they had seven children.

Paul Vinish
Paul Vinish

Paul Vinish

Search the database for Pál Vinis born in 1891

Baptised as Pál Vinis in Hungary and known as Paul Vinish in Canada. Paul immigrated from Herczegfalva, Fejér, Hungary in 1903 at the age of 12 with siblings Frank, John and Annie. Paul owned and operated a meat market in the village of Wakaw Saskatchewan. See the family tree for Paul's two marriages and blended family of five surviving children.

John Vinish
John Vinish

John Vinish

Search the database for János Vinis born in 1895. ID #I0253

Baptised as János Vinis, and known as John Vinish in Canada. He immigrated from Herczegfalva, Fejer, Hungary in 1903 at the age of 7 with siblings Frank, Paul and Annie. John married Mary Kraus from Herczegfava and they had a family of six children.

John's three sons are found in the database under the Vinnish spelling.

Anna Roll
Annie Roll

Annie Roll

Search the database for Anna Vinis

Baptised as Anna Vinis and known as Annie Vinish in Canada. Annie immigrated from Herczegfalva, Fejér, Hungary in 1903 with her three older brothers, Frank, Paul and John. She turned 4 during the voyage. Annie married Steve Roll and resided in Wakaw.


Joseph Vinish
Joseph Vinish

Joseph Vinish

Joe was born in 1906 and was the first of four children born on the homestead in Wakaw, Saskatchewan to Frank Vinish and Theresa Goller. He married Margaret Fogus and they raised nine children in Wakaw before moving to Spiritwood.

Stephen Vinnish
Stephen Vinnish

Stephen Vinnish

Search the database for Stephen Vinnish

Steve was born on the homestead in Wakaw, Saskatchewan in 1908. Together Steve and Pauline Koponyas had six children and resided in Mission B.C.

Theresa Muller
Theresa Muller

Theresa Muller

Search the database for Theresa Vinish born in 1911

Theresa Vinish was born in 1911 in Wakaw, SK, Canada. She married Joe Muller from Herczegfalva, Hungary. Theresa and Joe raised 12 children in Wakaw.

Mary Suveges
Mary Suveges

Mary Suveges

Search the database for Mary Vinish born in 1914

Mary Vinish was born on the homestead in 1914 in Wakaw Saskatchewan. She married Paul Suveges, followed by six children born in SK and BC.




Walking Back in Time

Herczegfalva

This area is an exciting new feature, however will take a while to develop. In the future when you click on the "More" button, it will take you to a new page where more information will be shared. The lovely pages you see now are a place holders and examples of future topics. I plan to feature specific people as well as families, not just ancestral villages. Your interest and input are important so please let me know whom or what you'd like to learn about our family. Contact me by using the "Contact Us" link at the tp or bottom of the screen, sending me an e-mail or asking the the family Facebook group. I look forward to hearing from you and our adventures together!

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Isztimér

Isztimér is where the Vinisch family lived before moving to Herczegfalva. More to come.

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Bakonyoszlop

Coming soon!

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Adony

More coming soon.
Tom wants to adopt this little fellow :-)

Duna Adony, today known as Adony in Fejér Megye (county) is where the Schmidt, and Neikl families came from. Also distant family marriages and DNA matches with the André, Viczkó and Kota families who immigrated to the Prud'homme, Saskatchwan area.

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Top 100 Surnames

ABELE ADLER ALMSTEUER ANDRÉ BÁTOR BAUER BAUR BIRKNER BOKOR BÖHM BRAUN CZETÖ CZIMMER DAKU DEÁK DOMOZI DUFEK EDL ELSHAW ELSZASSER FABER FETH FETT FOGUS GOLDSCHMIDT GOLLER GÖLLER GYÖRFY HABETLER HEGEDUS HEPP HOLCZER HOLZHAUSER HORN HORVÁTH HUJBER ISINGER KAISER KAPONYÁS KAUFMANN KLEIN KLICS KOCSIS KOTA KOVÁCS KRAUSZ KREITNER KULRICH KULRIK KUMINKA KUN KUNGL LEBER MAAR MÉNINGER MÉSZÁROS MISKOLCZI MOLNAR MÓZSER MULLER MÜLLER NAGY NÉGELE NEICHEL NEICHL NYIRFA OZSVÁLD PEITL PINKE PRIESTER PRINDL RÁCS RÉDL ROLL RUPPERT SCHEIDL SCHMIDT SCHNEBERGER SCHNEIDER SCHODERBECK SCHODERBEK SCHUDERPEK SIMON SUVEGES SVÁB SZAUTNER SZEKERES TELL TÓTH TREML TROPPERT VIDEMANN VINDISCH VINIS VINISCH VINISH VIRÁG VURST WURST ZIMMER



Our Favourite Genealogy Quotes

We hope you enjoy them!
  • Why waste your money looking up your family tree? Just go into politics and your opponents will do it for you.
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Every effort has been made for accuracy. If you have corrections, information or photos to add, or questions about this website I'll be glad to hear from you.